Maine Factoids with Zest

I love freebies as much as the next person, so I was happy to pick up a gratis copy of Zest Magazine, written for and by Maine foodies and hipsters, at our little local country market/convenience store.  (It’s available at Hannafords supermarket, Whole Foods, Barnes & Noble and local Maine book stores.)  While I didn’t care much for the style of writing, which tried a little too hard to sound au courant and cool but in fact was yet another example of dumbed-down conversational English that has no place in old-school journalism (okay, they’re not old school, but this reader most definitely is), the articles were truly diverse and interesting and Maine-centric, and the photography is gorgeous.

I learned:

  • the difference between dinner and supper
  • how to maximize one’s maple syrup tasting experience (it’s similar to wine glass-swirling)
  • that squirrels use their teeth to gouge out holes in young maple trees, and then drink the sap when it flows
  • that Maine’s daily per capita water consumption is the lowest in the nation (hooray for us)
  • that the wild blueberry crop uses the lion’s share of water needed by agriculture in Maine
  • the largest consumers of water in Maine aren’t people, they are paper mills
  • that most States in the US are losing farms, but Maine has the highest % of new farms in the past 5 years.
  • that the Maine friars who run an artisan brewery called Friars’ Brewhouse refer to themselves as “two schmucks on the side of a mountain in Bucksport with this home brew.”
  • how to make a New York pizza, which is apparently one thing you cannot get in Maine
  • that in the years between the American Revolution and the War of 1812, Maine was a major producer of sea salt
  • how to make gravalax with an easy recipe
  • what Governor LePage eats thanks to his in-house chef
  • how to read a Maine wine label (the $.15 deposit ticket tells you the name of the distributor, which gives hint to whether they are smaller and specialize in quality, adventurous wines)
  • How, when and what to plant in a Maine garden

Check it out and enjoy.

One response to this post.

  1. Posted by ברוך אתה on July 20, 2015 at 6:59 pm

    The reason for the low water usage per capita is because of the high number per capita of out houses.

    Reply

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