Israel, Day 7: Jerusalem

2014-05-21 06.50.37_resizedBefore leaving Midreshet Ben Gurion, we took a quick look at the new home construction.  One hundred eighty building lots were snapped up in less than 10 days.  Prices have already doubled.

There are many eco-conscious residents who are scientists, educators, agronomists, and architects living in Midreshet Ben Gurion, and many have incorporated their desert-related research about energy efficiency and the desert environment when building their homes.  There are straw-bale homes, solar homes, and now, for the first time in this new neighborhood, a rammed-earth home in the initial stages of construction.

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To the rear right side, a “sealed room” shelter of reinforced cement has been added to the house, required by code for every new dwelling in Israel in the event of rocket attack or war.

 

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On our way from the Negev headed north to Jerusalem, we traveled over the “Green Line” into areas of “shared” jurisdiction by the Palestinian Authority.  Unlike most of the rest of Israel, where Israelis and Arabs shop and work and study together, there was a sinister undercurrent. (ed. note:  this post was written a few days before 3 Israeli teenagers were kidnapped by terrorists, in the very area I was writing about.)

In front of every Arab city, town and village was a huge orange sign in English, Hebrew and Arabic that warned,

THE ENTRANCE FOR ISRAELI CITIZENS IS FORBIDDEN.”

And to think Israel has been accused of being an apartheid State!

I have never, ever seen such a sign in any Israeli city, town or village forbidding Arabs from entering, and wondered what the world at large would say if such signs did exist.  I know of no Israeli Jew who is welcome to study at Arab universities within “Palestinian territory”, nor receive medical aid at Arab hospitals; yet the reverse is certainly true:  Arabs receive degrees from all Israeli universities and are treated at Israeli hospitals throughout the country.  How poisonous is this blind hatred!

Before going to Jerusalem, we drove to the nearby city of Ma’aleh Adumim, where we visited with friends.  We knew we didn’t want to drive our rental car within Jerusalem’s city limits due to traffic, overcrowding, and too many one-way streets.  There are buses every 10 -15 minutes to Jerusalem from Ma’aleh Adumim, and so we happily boarded an outgoing bus, reaching Jeruslaem’s Central Bus Station within 15 minutes.  The new-ish train was also full of commuters.  At the bus station, which is filled with small shops, we made the only touristy purchase of our trip:  some new kippot (yarmulkas) for my husband and a couple of headscarves for myself — a total of 15 minutes.  Since we hadn’t come to shop for souvenirs nor Judaica, we were not planning to hit Geula, Mea Shearim, or Ben Yehuda to buy any touristy stuff.  I had only two places on my Jerusalem agenda:  shuk Machane Yehuda (the open-air market) and the Kotel (Western Wall.)

After buying Israeli chocolate bars for our grandchildren in the U.S., we left the shuk, grabbed a delicious and inexpensive shwarma at a roadside stand (where we ate alongside religious and secular Israelis, as well as Muslim and Christian Arabs all enjoying the delicious food), and made our way to the Kotel.  It was now dusk.

As we made our way towards the Kotel entrance, an amazing sight greeted us:  tens of thousands of people, with barely space to move!

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Unbeknownst to us, we had walked right into a special military ceremony, in which newly inducted members of the Golani brigade recite their oaths of allegiance to the State of Israel.

It was highly moving; hundreds of soldiers stood in their platoons in the plaza reciting the oath, as thousands of family members looked on from the sides with tears of bittersweet joy and pride.  To ensure that everyone could see, huge screens showing the soldiers up close were placed throughout the plaza.  These new soldiers consisted of sabras and immigrants from Ethiopia, Russia, France, the United States, Canada, and South America, religious and secular.  It was extremely moving to hear tens of thousands of voices – – soldiers, their families, and general visitors to the Kotel — sing Hatikva, Israel’s national anthem, as one.

But the highlight, for me, was at the ceremony’s conclusion, when the soldiers were allowed to rejoin their families.  There was a mad rush as grandparents, mothers, fathers, sons, daughters, brothers and sisters found one another across the plaza, embracing with joy and pride and all stopping to take pictures of the occasion.

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Israel is a small country, and the degrees of separation are few.  Nearly every Israeli has a relative who was killed fighting one of Israel’s many wars.  Nearly every Israeli knows someone killed or gravely injured in a terrorist attack.  Imagine how difficult it is for parents and siblings and girlfriends to wish “mazal tov” to these sons and daughters of Israel, and yet they do so with pride, hope, fear, prayer, faith, appreciation, gratitude and joy.

Our unexpected encounter at the Kotel was one of the highlights of our trip.  And with deep feeling, I davened at the Wall, praying not only on behalf of sick friends, on behalf of the welfare of my family, and of Jews around the world.  I prayed for those hundreds of Golani soldiers, that HaShem should protect them; that they should survive, live and thrive in the Land of Israel for their families’ sake and for the sake of all Jews, everywhere.

Please pray for the safe return of teenagers Yaakov Naftali ben Rachel Devora, Gilad Michael ben Bat Galim, and Eyal ben Iris Teshurah, who were abducted by terrorists on their way home from school.

 

 

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